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COVID-19 Vaccinations

IMPORTANT COVID-19 VACCINE SITE UPDATE

COVID-19 vaccinations are offered at the Florida Department of Health in Osceola County (FDOH-Osceola) main campus, located at 1875 Fortune Road in Kissimmee. Appointments are preferred, and those interested in scheduling a first dose, second dose, or booster vaccination appointment may contact the FDOH-Osceola call center at 407-552-0120.

For additional locations for COVID-19 vaccinations, please visit vaccines.gov.

ELIGIBILITY FOR COVID-19 VACCINATIONS

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Vaccine Manufacturer Pfizer-BioNTech Moderna Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Who Can Get This Vaccine? People 5 years and older People 18 years and older People 18 years and older Number of Shots? 2 shots given 21 days apart 2 shots given 28 days apart 1 shot When Are You Considered Fully Vaccinated? 2 weeks after second shot 2 weeks after second shot 2 weeks after shot Additional Dose Recommended for moderately to severely immunocompromised people. Given 4 weeks after second shot. Recommended for moderately to severely immunocompromised people. Given 4 weeks after second shot. Not recommended at this time. Booster Dose You are eligible for a booster if you are: • 65 years or older • Age 18+ who live in long term care settings • Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions • Age 18+ who work or live in high risk settings When to get a booster: At least 6 months after second shot. Heterologous Booster Dose is Allowed. You are eligible for a booster* if you are: • 65 years or older • Age 18+ who live in long term care settings • Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions • Age 18+ who work or live in high risk settings *Booster dose is a half-dose (.25mL) When to get a booster: At least 6 months after second shot. Heterologous Booster Dose is Allowed. You are eligible for a booster if you are: • 18 years or older When to get a booster: At least 2 months after shot. Heterologous Booster Dose is Allowed Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Research and design courtesy of the Florida Department of Health in Manatee County.

BOOSTER DOSES

The Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) endorsed the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) expanded recommendations for booster shots to include all adults ages 18 years and older who received a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine at least six months after their second dose.

The CDC recommends the following:

You should get a booster if you are:

  • Ages 50 years and older
  • Ages 18 years and older and live in a long-term care setting

You may get a booster if you are:

  • Ages 18 years and older

When to get a booster:

  • At least 6 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series

Booster doses are available at the Florida Department of Health in Osceola County (FDOH-Osceola) for eligible populations by appointment only. Individuals interested in scheduling an appointment may call the FDOH-Osceola call center at 407-552-0120.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Updated November 23, 2021

Who is eligible to receive a vaccine at this site?

Individuals 5 years of age and older are eligible to receive the Pfizer vaccine. Individuals 18 years of age and older are eligible to receive the Moderna vaccine. All individuals under the age of 18 receiving a vaccine must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian and provide a completed COVID-19 vaccine screening and consent form.

How do I schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment?

Those interested in scheduling a first dose, second dose or booster vaccination appointment may contact the FDOH-Osceola call center at 407-552-0120.

What proof of residency items do I need to bring?

We ask that all individuals bring proof of residency to their vaccine appointment.

Examples of proof of residency include:

  • A deed, mortgage, monthly mortgage statement, mortgage payment booklet or residential rental or lease agreement.
  • One proof of residential address from the seasonal resident’s parent, stepparent, legal guardian or other person with whom the seasonal resident resides and a statement from the person with whom the seasonal resident resides stating that the seasonal resident does reside with him or her.
  • A utility hookup or work order
  • A utility bill, not more than 2 months old
  • Mail from a financial institution, including checking, savings, or investment account statements, not more than 2 months old.
  • Mail from a federal, state, county, or municipal government agency, not more than 2 months old.

I’m a part-time resident, am I eligible to receive the vaccine?

Part-time residents are eligible to receive a vaccine in Florida. A part-time resident is any person who temporarily resides in this state for a period of at least 31 consecutive days in each calendar year, maintains a temporary residence in this state, returns to the state or jurisdiction of his or her residence at least one time during each calendar year, and is registered to vote or pays income tax in another state or jurisdiction. Those individuals who are present in Florida for the purpose of providing goods or services for the benefit of residents and visitors of the State of Florida may also receive the vaccine.

After I receive my first dose of vaccine, how do I schedule my second dose appointment?

Individuals vaccinated at FDOH-Osceola’s main campus will be provided with their second dose appointment at the time of their first dose.

My second dose appointment is after the day listed on my CDC card. Will the vaccine still be effective?

Per guidance issued by the CDC, the second dose should be administered as close to the recommended interval as possible. However, if it is not feasible to adhere to the recommended interval, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine may be scheduled for administration up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose.

What do I need to bring to my second dose or booster dose appointment?

Individuals need to bring their CDC vaccination card, a form of identification and proof of residency to their second dose or booster dose appointment.

What do I do if I lost my CDC vaccine card?

It is critical that individuals bring their CDC vaccine card to their second appointment. However, if you have lost this card, individuals on site can access your information.

I have mobility issues, will there be accommodations at the vaccine site?

FDOH-Osceola can make accommodations for individuals with mobility issues at our vaccination site. If an accommodation needs to be made, alert staff on the site when you arrive.

8 Things to Know about the U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Now that there are authorized and recommended vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in the United States, here are 8 things you need to know about the COVID-19 Vaccination Program and COVID-19 vaccines.

1) The safety of COVID-19 vaccines is a top priority.

The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Learn how federal partners are working together to ensure the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

CDC has developed a new tool, v-safe, as an additional layer of safety monitoring to increase our ability to rapidly detect any safety issues with COVID-19 vaccines. V-safe is a new smartphone-based, after-vaccination health checker for people who receive COVID-19 vaccines.

2) COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. Two doses are needed.

Depending on the specific vaccine you get, a second shot 3-4 weeks after your first shot is needed to get the most protection the vaccine has to offer against this serious disease. Learn more about the benefits of getting vaccinated.

3) CDC is making recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first when supplies are limited.

To help guide decisions about how to distribute limited initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine, CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have published recommendations for which groups should be vaccinated first.

4)There is currently a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, but supply will increase in the weeks and months to come.

The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get vaccinated against COVID-19 as soon as large enough quantities are available. Once vaccine is widely available, the plan is to have several thousand vaccination providers offering COVID-19 vaccines in doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers.

5) After COVID-19 vaccination, you may have some side effects. This is a normal sign that your body is building protection.

The side effects from COVID-19 vaccination may feel like flu and might even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Learn more about what side effects to expect and get helpful tips on how to reduce pain and discomfort after your vaccination.

6) Cost is not an obstacle to getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. However, vaccination providers may be able to charge administration fees for giving the shot. Vaccination providers can get this fee reimbursed by the patient’s public or private insurance company or, for uninsured patients, by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Provider Relief Fund.

7) The first COVID-19 vaccine is being used under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Many other vaccines are still being developed and tested.

If more COVID-19 vaccines are authorized or approved by FDA, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will quickly hold public meetings to review all available data about each vaccine and make recommendations for their use in the United States. Learn more about how CDC is making COVID-19 vaccine recommendations.

All ACIP-recommended vaccines will be included in the U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program. CDC continues to work at all levels with partners, including healthcare associations, on a flexible COVID-19 vaccination program that can accommodate different vaccines and adapt to different scenarios. State, tribal, local, and territorial health departments have developed distribution plans to make sure all recommended vaccines are available to their communities.

8) COVID-19 vaccines are one of many important tools to help us stop this pandemic.

It’s important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around others, stay at least 6 feet away from others, avoid crowds, and wash your hands often.

Click here for additional important information issued by the CDC about the COVID-19 vaccine.